Precolumbian dating back to

Posted by / 22-Nov-2016 09:51

— Peru 1250 AD - 1450 AD Two Inca (Inka) copper axes from the Central Peruvian Highlands. It is quite remarkable that this very large vessel has never been broken. Originally acquired by Chris at a charity auction in Pasadena, CA in the 1970s. These Inca examples are all of similar shape and made of hammered copper. Ample deposits present; a few small areas of white caliche encrustation on one side. The vessel is carved, not mold made and shows a seated lord and glyphs around the top. The elongated oval body is topped by a short neck and rounded spout. The Copilco culture was one of the first and most important ceremonial centers in the Valley of Mexico during that time. A wide band at the midsection shows a connected diamond pattern. Solid construction from buff (unpainted) terracotta, typical of the region and time period. At the base of the handle are two ball-shaped objects (appearing as testicles) which form the whistles. A crack in the main body has been stabilized and restored. Minor scrapes and dings present along with deposits and some fire clouding. The remainder was later sold through various art auctions in NYC. A flared bowl sits atop three large jaguar heads, each containing their original rattle balls. The figure is of hollow construction with red, tan and black painted and burnished surface. 0 — Peru 400 AD - 600 AD A large and impressive Moche Phase IV portrait vessel from the Northern Coastal region of ancient Peru. 50 — Costa Rica - Panama 1100 AD - 1450 AD An unusual pottery vessel in the form of an armadillo. 5 — Peru 1000 AD - 1400 AD A Chancay painted bowl from ancient Peru. Outside of the obvious losses, they are intact with nice deposits. The face and hands are painted in yellow-gold pigment, otherwise covered in a cream-tan slip with deposits and some root marks present. Assembled from original pieces (as is common) with break lines restored and minor losses replaced. In the other hand is a five-lobed ceremonial rattle. 0 — Peru 700 AD - 1000 AD A rare Wari aryballo (water transport vessel) from ancient Peru. The vessel is rounded with a flat bottom and has a flared spout. Rounded bottom with corseted sides; an elegant form. The jaguar body wraps around the neck of the vessel and has incised geometric patterns along both sides. Constance de Beausset estate of Grosse Point, Michigan. Both arms are extended upward in a welcoming gesture. 00 — Peru 900 AD - 1200 AD A Chancay woven textile panel from ancient Peru. The central image is divided by a red band, half in a curving serpent-like design, the other half in a basket-weave pattern. The lower half of the vessel has incised geometric designs known as the 'flame-brow' motif. The flame-brow design originated on Olmec pottery from approximately 1000 years earlier and has also been seen on Maya vessels of eastern Mesoamerica. The surface is an orange buff terracotta with a few areas of fire clouding. A superb example that is larger than most of this type and displays dramatically. An incredibly rare matched set that are massive in size. Scattered deposits and some very light surface wear. Above that is a domed platform topped by a large seated figure with hands resting on his legs. A cylindrical bowl sits on three hollow, rounded legs. 5 — Panama 600 AD - 800 AD An attractive Cocle polychrome pedestal bowl from ancient Panama. The stomach protrudes slightly, possibly indicating pregnancy. During such altered states of consciousness, shamans would communicate with spiritual beings as well as the deceased, and travel on shamanic journeys in the supernatural realm. The most extraordinary feature of this vessel is a fully articulated head that is rotatable within the neck of a human body which protrudes from the side of the bowl. She wears a turban style head wrap, necklace and ear ornaments. The foreleg has been restored and the head reattached with a restored breakline. The legs support a semi-hemispherical bowl with curving shoulder that is decorated with appliques and incised bands, topped by tall chimney-type neck and flared spout. A large section of the neck has been replaced along with other repairs and surface touch ups.Although referred to as 'axes', these were not made for use as weapons, but were chisels (tools) used to shape and carve stone. Its size, form and condition make this an amazing example that displays dramatically on the custom metal stand which is included. There are three sizes here, possibly representing different monetary denominations. The surface is also slightly clouded by a salt-lime haze which could be cleaned, but is currently in original, as found condition. Many of the glyphs are readable and include 'imix' (meaning plentiful), hand glyphs (scattering), 'ahau' (lord), vulture head glyphs and a number of others which together complete the Primary Standard Sequence. A wide strap handle is attached to the neck and upper shoulder. Their art shows strong Olmec and Tlatilco influence as is seen in the prominent lips and pierced eyes. A nice example from one of Mesoamerica's earliest cultures. The top section is divided into quadrants each with a central figure. The figure is shown standing with arms stretched outward (sonriente style) and wears a loin cloth, nose ornament and large earspools. A fine and very early example of erotic art from that region. The jaguar motif continues on the interior of the bowl where a row of four stylized felines circle the inner rim. A classic depiction of the Chinesco 'Type-D' style. This life-size example portrays an individual with chubby cheeks; possibly a depiction of a 'coca chewer'. Heavily potted from a coarse gritty clay indicative of Costa Rican wares, but shows strong Panamanian (Cocle) stylistic influence. Rounded bowl with nearly straight neck and rolled rim. The hands are nicely sculpted and show painted fingernails. The head is intact with only two spout chips restored. Approx 13" tall x 8.5" across 5 — Costa Rica 400 AD - 700 AD An unusual tripod rattle vessel from Costa Rica's Atlantic Watershed Zone. Redware construction with opposing loop handles and flared spout. A male figure emerges from the upper shoulder of the vessel. Nicely painted with a band of glyphs or pseudo-glyphs in vibrant shades of red and black against a tan background. The front and back legs are incised and have paws (claws) sculpted in low relief. He (she) smiles widely exposing filed teeth and has almond shaped eyes. It depicts a central band of stylized birds with rows of waves (water motif) at the top and bottom. The gently curving sides of the bowl are finely painted in diagonal stripes. The back is completely painted with parallel lines in black on tan. Assembled from approximately six original pieces with breaklines partially restored and slightly visible. The cream colored surface is nicely burnished inside and out with areas of orange and black (fire clouding) on one side. Assembled from three original pieces with breaks restored. Minor surface wear, dings and scratches along with light deposits consistent with age. By far the largest examples of this type I have ever seen. 0 — Costa Rica 1100 AD - 1500 AD A nice Nicoya pottery dish with a rare depiction of the "Dancing Monkey Deity". The top of the figures head is open and serves as a pouring spout. — Various Cultures 500 BC - 1500 AD NOTE: Six additional miniatures have been added to this listing. A wide central band of incised geometric designs decorate the exterior. This type of vessel, typically called a 'frutera', has a flared pedestal base topped by a deep bowl painted with complex geometric and zoomorphic designs. 0 — Ecuador 500 BC - 200 AD Small Jamacoaque rattle figure from ancient Ecuador. She wears an asymmetrical headdress with nodes across the forehead, nose ornament, lip plug (labret) and necklace with a large pendant. Large figures of shamans, such as this one, are indicative of their high status in Jamacoaque culture and are often depicted displaying their ceremonial paraphernalia as symbols of power. Two sets of museum codes written in ink across the top. Vessels with articulated parts are exceedingly rare in Costa Rican pottery. Minor losses replaced and several repaired breaks at the rim. Two of the legs have been reattached and partially restored. Faint remains of white pigment on the legs and traces of black on body of the vessel. Overall an impressive piece that displays dramatically. See page 62 of the "Art of Costa Rica from the Arthur M.When someone finally did, the shrill, windy screech made the spine tingle. Roberto Velazquez believes the Aztecs played this mournful wail from the so-called Whistles of Death before they were sacrificed to the gods.The 66-year-old mechanical engineer has devoted his career to recreating the sounds of his pre-Columbian ancestors, producing hundreds of replicas of whistles, flutes and wind instruments unearthed in Mexico’s ruins.Scientists were fascinated by the ghostly find: a human skeleton buried in an Aztec temple with a clay, skull-shaped whistle in each bony hand.But no one blew into the noisemakers for nearly 15 years.When a Colombian sugarcane plantation worker and his tractor plunged into a hole which had suddenly opened up in the earth, the spectacular discovery buried under the soil would lead to a large-scale...Long before modern warfare, there was a time of knights in shining armor atop equally armored horses fighting for the hand of a maiden or in pitched battle.

This gallery will be regularly updated so check back often. Ample deposits, and light surface wear present overall. Blackware terracotta construction and elongated spherical body with stirrup handle topped by a straight neck and flared spout. — West Mexico 100 BC - 250 AD A nice pair of Jalisco female figures. Both are made from a gray (slate-like) sedimentary stone characteristic of the area. An elegant shape with a flared pedestal base and a sharply angled bowl. The upper shoulder of the bowl is decorated with finely incised linear and stippled geometric patterns. A relatively unknown culture, their pottery is exceptionally well crafted and beautifully painted in colors and styles very similar to the neighboring Tiwanaku, but their wares are typically more refined in their execution. — Peru 1100 AD - 1350 AD A lovely Chimu stirrup vessel from ancient Peru. — Peru 100 AD - 400 AD Two Antara (pan pipes) from the southern coastal region of ancient Peru. The upper section is an elaborately embellished dome. The top spout is painted in a checkerboard pattern and has two pierced lugs which would have been used to secure a lid. The vessel has a flat bottom, the body is rounded and topped by a realistically sculpted head and a wide flared spout. Of the Conti style with red and black linear decoration on an orange-tan ground. The upper body of the vessel is dome-shaped and decorated with six realistically rendered chili peppers. Both are polychrome painted in shades of red-orange and black against a cream background. He also wears a domed headdress and is holding a large pan flute. A single stress crack along the lower chamber has been stabilized and restored. An exceptional example of pseudo-cloisonne (stucco) pottery. The bowls are attached at the rim and again at the base. The surface is a lovely pale-orange slip and shows deposits and fine root marks. A very long tail is shown curving away from and around the body of the bird, following the contour of the bowl. Assembled from large (original) fragments with break lines restored and light paint enhancements. The background of each section has raised dots, representing rain. The cape is decorated with oval appliques (possibly representing cocoa beans) and a pectoral featuring a human face carved into a curved horn. Nicely carved from a greenish-gray stone in the form of a celt. A few edge chips along with minor scrapes and dings, but overall a nice example and rarely seen in this size. Near excellent condition with restoration to one leg; else intact and choice.

Provenance and accurate, detailed condition information is included with each listing. Discount may apply on the purchase of multiple items. International sales (outside of the United States) require payment via Pay Pal. At the base of each handle, upper body of the vessel, are two nicely detailed human figures, lying flat. This type of ancient 'money' was used in the trading (and purchasing) of merchandise by the Inca. Each has a large nose and impressed eyes and mouth. The seated figure has an area of fire clouding on the back and a restored hand. Both are from the same estate collection; they were likely found together and appear to have been made by the same artist. Mounted on custom metal display stands which are included. The eyes and nose are sculpted in high relief with pierced nostrils and slit mouth. 0 — Mexico - Guatemala 650 AD - 900 AD A fine Classic Period Maya blackware cylinder from the border of Campeche, Mexico and the Peten region of Guatemala. The stirrup handle is slightly flattened (squared) on the sides and is topped by a straight spout. Constructed of grayish terracotta, burnished overall and painted with faint wide bands (in red) around the outer edge. At the top are two stepped ridges that encircle the spout, loop handle and spherical whistles. 0 — Costa Rica 1200 AD - 1500 AD A beautifully painted 'Pataky Polychrome' tripod vessel from the Nicoya-Guanacaste region of ancient Costa Rica. Nicely knapped from black volcanic glass, these rare and fragile objects were worn as pectorals via two suspension holes. At the lower front, the lord's hands extend outward holding staffs decorated with beaded plumes. He also wears large ear spools and a beaded necklace with multi-layered tassels. The vessel is of an ovoid spherical form, rounded on the bottom and with a gently flared spout. — Vera Cruz, Mexico 600 AD - 900 AD A rare and exceptional Sonriente figure from the Remojadas region of ancient Veracruz. 17.5" x 9.5" 5 — West Mexico 200 BC - 400 AD A large Nayarit plate (shallow bowl) from ancient West Mexico. 0 — Mexico 400 AD - 750 AD A Teotihuacan tripod vessel from ancient Mexico. The three gracefully curving legs are decorated with stylized bird heads with long beaks, likely representing the heads of pelicans. A chip on the spout is restored, but it is otherwise intact. A few minor scrapes and dings along with light deposits (consistent with age) as would be expected. Smaller than most of this type, but is a really cute piece that displays well. The painting style and motif of each vessel is nearly identical. This very thin-walled vessel shows expert craftsmanship; exceptional construction and is nicely painted with red linear designs against a golden yellow ground. The rounded spherical lower chamber sits on pointy, cone-shaped tripod legs. Surface shows minor wear and paint loss with light erosion, all consistent with age. One small shard on the bottom has been replaced along with some areas of stucco replaced or enhanced. The practice of inhaling hallucinogens was critical to the shamans of Pre-Columbian times. Carved from green speckled stone with earthen deposits. The headdress is two alligator heads facing outward. Restoration to the corner of the head and one foot. The exterior is nicely incised with complex geometric patterns. Both are of buff terracotta clay, well made with fine details and light deposits. 8" tall Seated figure - 0 Standing figure — Costa Rica 400 AD - 700 AD Very large Costa Rican tripod rattle vessel from the Central Highlands - Atlantic Watershed Zone, dating to Period IV-V.

Contact me via email at: [email protected] call 828-322-2942. All international shipping costs, insurance and import fees are the responsibility of the buyer. The surface is burnished blackware with light deposits, mainly in the crevices. Minor chips missing from the edge of the spout, otherwise completely intact and original with no repairs or restoration. Much like the copper hoe-money (tajaderas) that was used by the Aztecs of Mexico. They wear arm bands, elaborate (tassel-like) ear assemblages and head wraps. The standing figure has a restored hand and partially restored foot. An exceptionally rare, very closely matching pair of ancient figures. The orangeware vessel is painted overall in black and reds with complex geometric designs of linear and angular patterns. One eye is chipped otherwise completely intact with no cracks, breaks or repairs. A squat cylinder with highly burnished black-brown surface, somewhat common for that area. — Peru 950 AD - 1350 AD A very large Chancay storage vessel from ancient Peru. — Mexico 1200 BC - 800 BC A rare Copilco pottery figure dating to the Middle Pre-classic Period. The upper half of the vessel is intricately carved. 0 — Mexico 600 AD - 900 AD A standing Vera Cruz figure dating to the late Classic Period. The spout is in the form of a penis with the strap handle attached to the side. One whistle has been returned to working order, the other is non-functioning. The Abrams made their fortune in the publishing business and were avid collectors of fine art and artifacts. Much of their collection was donated to numerous museums. Constructed of reddish earthenware covered overall in a cream slip with red, orange and black painted designs, typical of the type. Approx 4.5" tall x 6.5" across 5 — West Mexico 200 BC - 100 AD A Chinesco seated female figure from the Nayarit region of Western Mexico. The two shown here are incomplete; each is missing a portion of one side. The beaded feather assemblages are repeated along the top of the headdress along with tassels and circular appliques with carved geometric designs. In one hand is a spherical object, likely representing a pottery vessel. 0 — Ecuador 300 BC - 500 AD A Bahia vessel from ancient Ecuador. 0 — El Salvador 400 AD - 700 AD A Maya glyph bowl dating to the Classic Period. At the neck is a stylized jaguar with a realistically sculpted head. Hollow, terracotta construction; it depicts a seated youth with typical gleeful expression. Polychrome painted in the 'fineline' technique with red and black against a tan slip. Townsend's "Ancient West Mexico", page 79, for similar examples and info on this type. A cylindrical bowl sits on three solid rectangular legs. The legs are hollow and contain numerous rattle balls. Light surface wear consistent with age and extended burial, but is intact and original with no repairs or restoration. Most likely found together and probably created (or at least painted) by the same artist. Condition is very good, near excellent with a small hairline crack and minor rim chips restored. Around the top of the lower chamber is a band of incised decoration done in a repeating triangular pattern. 7.25" tall x 7" across 50 — Mexico 300 AD - 400 AD A medium-large Teotihuacan tripod vessel dating to the Early Xolalpan Period. Light to moderate staining and deposits as would be expected, but displays beautifully on a custom metal stand which is included. It enabled them to induce shamanic trances and visions. The bowl sits atop three hollow mammiform legs, each containing a rattle ball. Seated figure: Rarely seen in the seated position, this female figure has hands held to chest and crossed legs. Standing figure: This example is wearing elaborate regalia; multilayered waist wrap, arm bands, necklace and a horned headdress thought to indicate a shaman or person of high status. One arm has been restored along with other very minor repairs. It has pierced tapered tripod legs, each containing numerous small rattle balls.

• Definition • History • Mesoamerica • Timeline of Pre-Columbian Mesoamerican Art - Ceremonial Architecture - Sculpture - Ceramics - Codices and Murals - Featherwork and Mosaics • South America • Chronology of Pre-Columbian South American Art - Architecture - Carvings - Pottery - Metalworking - Textiles The term "Pre-Columbian art" refers to the architecture, art and crafts of the native peoples of North, Central, and South America, and the islands of the Caribbean (c.13,000 BCE - 1500 CE) up to the time period marked by the arrival of Christopher Columbus in the Americas. The term "Mesoamerica" is synonymous with Central America, describing a cultural region in the Americas, which extends roughly from central Mexico to Belize, Guatemala, El Salvador, Honduras, Nicaragua, and northern Costa Rica.

The civilisations of Central America (Mesoamerica) and the Pacific Coast of South America were roughly contemporary with the European Christian era.

precolumbian dating back to-90precolumbian dating back to-67precolumbian dating back to-45

One thought on “precolumbian dating back to”

  1. Back then, “the facebook thing” was still a rough idea, and 18-year-old Zuckerberg was trying to finesse the concept. “I don’t think people would sign up for the facebook thing if they knew it was for dating,” Zuckerberg wrote.